The Feminization of my Head

Witnessing the end of an era

As an aspiration for this year

As something of a New Year’s resolution, I would like to “feminize my head” or, in a more modern style, “coming out of my mind”. When I witness the endless chaos of today’s world and society, I believe that the main cause of mankind’s deterioration can be attributed to the system in which “men” have reigned for so many years. And I believe that my “man” is now faced with the necessity of “coming out” of himself, of sharpening his sense of equilibrium.

For example, if we take the current war in Ukraine, we can see that it is also ultimately rooted in the confrontation between these face and dignity of “men”.

This is a story that sounds like the opposite in terms of language, but Putin’s Russia-loving and anti-NATO assertion is more of a feminine and irrationalistic outpouring of sentiment, while the democratic ideals on the Ukrainian and NATO side are a unity of “male” rationalism.

Both of them have a point, but the question is whether it is an issue that must be settled by resorting to war, and if we ask where the idea to go to such lengths comes from, I think it stems from the stubbornness to maintain one’s face and reputation based on the idea of men and elites. I think it is because of their stubbornness to maintain their face and dignity based on their own conception.

Of course, I think it is reasonable to believe that there is no need to do so, but when I look back on my path that led to such a way of thinking, I think there may have been more than a few ways to overcome such a problem. That is why I am “coming out,” in other words, LGBTQ+ in relation to my own existence, as anyone would be. Or we could say it is an acknowledgement of each other’s diversity. Depending on how you look at it, it is a kind of anarchy.

 

In retrospect, Japan’s war in the Asia-Pacific 80 years ago was, as David Bergamini, the author of “Japan’s Imperial Conspiracy,” subtitled it, “How Emperor Hirohito led Japan into war against the West”. In that sense, Emperor Hirohito was leading a war to the same end almost a century before Putin. In other words, the Aia-Pacific War and the Ukrainian War both had at their root the conflict between the East and the West.

By the middle of the 20th century, the West had the technological trump card of the atomic bomb, which crushed the resentment of the East. In this respect, it can be said that the West still had the advantage of being able to use “justice” as its banner, apart from human morality, in physical terms.

Now, however, the physical trump cards are spread everywhere, not just on both sides, and the situation is no longer simple enough to be settled by them. In other words, the global power relations have reached such a point of stalemate – some call it “multi-polarization” – that it is becoming increasingly difficult to reach a settlement. The leading model is disappearing, or the world is diversifying.

Thus, “diversification” is certainly a reality, both in terms of the world and individuals, and it is spreading.

 

As a “man,” I see the era as a dead end of the age of “man’s face and dignity” in the context of the above. In other words, I see the era as being brought about by a combination of the limitations of the prevailing ideas of the past, whether rationalism or the legitimacy of science and technology, or any number of other ways of looking at it.

So, although I am not Mao Zedong, I believe that the heavens are supported by half men and half women, and that if the men can’t do it, then it is up to the women to do it.

Furthermore, for me, the feminization of men’s heads is also synonymous with the “arrival of the age of the Orient” (see, for example, “The Fusion of East and West, Even Here”). Of course, China’s “China is World Model” is a second-hand version of such a Western-centric view, but it is my wish that the era of that kind of manly pride will come to an end. At the very least, it is a viewpoint that requires a fusion of the East and the West.

 

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